Author Archives: MMAFightwear

What is in your Kit Bag?

Take a look at  our check list of equipment and apparel that every serious MMA athlete should have at their disposal:

1 – A good quality Head Guard

An essential piece of equipment to ensure that you are protected as much as possible when sparring.

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Featured Product: Hayabusa Ikusa Head Guard

2 – Gum Shield

Another item on the list that is a must for sparring sessions. Protect your teeth, mouth and gums because no matter how careful you may be when sparring, accidents can happen, even when head guards are being worn.

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Featured Product: Shock Doctor Gel Max Mouthguard Black

3 – MMA Gloves

A pair of 4oz MMA Gloves will enable you to engage in sparring, pad work and leave your hands free enough to make the seamless transition to grappling, using the same weight of glove that you would use for competition.

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Featured Product: Hayabusa Tokushu 4oz MMA Gloves

4 – MMA Hybrid / Sparring Gloves

The heavier weighted 7oz MMA Hybrid, or MMA Sparring Gloves, are useful to have if you want to include some heavier sparring or pad work in to your training. The increased padding offers more protection for you and your training partner than the 4oz MMA Gloves, but their finger loop designs also keep the hands as free as possible for grappling too.

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Featured Product: PRO MMA 7oz MMA Sparring Gloves

5 – Hand Wraps

The humble hand wrap is essential for protecting your knuckles, hands and wrists when boxing sparring or hitting the heavy bag. You’ll always want to have a pair of these, literally to hand, if you’re planning on working on your boxing technique as they can be the difference between a good training session or causing some long term damage to your most valuable of weapons.

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Featured Product: Hayabusa 100% Premium Bamboo No Stretch Hand Wraps

6 – Boxing Gloves

As an MMA fighter, honing your stand up striking game, working on your stand up movement and foot work can be greatly improved by the quality of your boxing training. For this, you will need to make sure that you have the right gloves for the job. Any self respecting MMA kit bag will include good quality Boxing Sparring Gloves and Heavy Bag Gloves at the least.

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Featured Product: Hayabusa Sport 16oz Training Gloves Black

7 – Rash Guard

In the interest of comfort and hygiene, wearing a rash guard will reduce the chances of picking up skin infections on the mat as well keep your body as cool and as dry as possible. Due to the close contact nature and intensity of the training, you’l benefit from wearing a rash guard when running BJJ and grappling drills.

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Featured Product: Grips Athletics Short Sleeved Wasp Rashgaurd

8 – Compression Shorts & Cup

Whilst this may not be a kit bag essential for everyone, but there are those that prefer to wear tighter fitting compression style shorts, especially for vale tudo, grappling and wrestling training.

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Featured Product: Shock Doctor Core Compression Shorts with Bio Flex Cup

9 – MMA Shorts

Due to specific design features, a good quality pair of MMA shorts will allow you to move as freely as possible without restriction, this is essential for such a dynamic sport like MMA where speed and movement are key features.

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Featured Product: Hayabusa Metaru Performance Shorts

10 – Shin Guards

It is common for Muay Thai and kick boxing drills to make up a significant part of your MMA training. Along with practising these and other disciplines that heavily feature kicking, it is important to make sure that your shins and ankles are protected as much as possible. For heavier contact sessions, you’ll want to have a pair of striking or thai shin guards to hand, these are thickly padded and have extra foot and ankle protection. For lighter contact sessions, where you want to include some ground work in to the session, you will need the lighter and smaller style grappling shin guards..

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Featured Product: Hayabusa Ikusa Shin Guards

What about the kit bag itself? A good mma kit or gym bag, will be large enough to carry your essentials and will often feature perforated or breathable material to help reduce bacteria build up and unpleasant odours. Such kit bags normally have compartments to help store and keep your dry and wet gear separate too.

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Featured Product: Bad Boy Champion Bag

 

Best UFC Walkout Songs

In no particular order, check out our list of favourite UFC walkout tunes, past and present.

Nick Denis, “Genesis” by Justice

Talk about making a grand entrance! This song definitely states that you have entered the building and are about to start something!

If this one doesn’t get you pumped then you need to wake up.

Forrest Griffin, “I’m Shipping Up to Boston” by the Dropkick Murphys

Sounding like something that would perfectly accompany a good old fashioned bar room brawl, this testosterone fuelled, folk lyric inspired track comes from the band’s aptly named album; “The Warrior’s Code”.

With no disrespect to the track itself, there is definitely an element of “stop what you are doing right now and lets smash something up” to this one.

Alan Belcher, “The Hurricane” by Bob Dylan

More of a mini bio than a song, this Dylan classic recites the story of the turbulent life of Ruben Carter, a fighter and man famous for battling and winning against the odds.

Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira, “Gimme Shelter” by the Rolling Stones

Find a cooler song to make your entrance to and we’ll bow down to you.

Going down a different road to the adrenaline pumping style noise fest, there’s a reason why this Rolling Stones classic has been used repeatedly by the equally cool Martin Scorcese in not one, not two, but three of his films!

Evan Tanner and Razak Al-Hassan—”All Along the Watchtower” by Jimi Hendrix

Another favourite with Hollywood directors, having a similar “cool” quality to it has Nogueira’s choice, this cover of a Dylan classic by Jimi Hendrix makes you feel that it’s time to brace yourself for a moments moment of reckoning that is about to happen!

Benefits of Strength Training for Martial Arts

 Despite what you might think, we are not talking about developing brute strength to overcome your opponents at the expense of good technique here. The benefits of Strength Training for Martial Arts focuses on improving your technique and getting stronger without unnecessarily bulking up. Check out the list of good reasons below to include this kind of training in to your regular routine.

Better Protect Yourself Agains Injuries

You are in the midst of your final training session leading up to a fight and you slip or execute something you have been working on with poor technique.

In that split second all your hard work and build up could amount to nothing.

This is a chance all athletes take when pushing themselves to the limit, after all, we are all only human and mistakes can happen.

Athletes at all levels will take measures to reduce injuries and other negative impacts on performance, Strength Training can be just one of those measures.

By increasing the strength of your muscles around your joints , this can help to give them extra support and stability when something goes wrong. This extra support could make the difference between injury prevention or being sidelined for weeks or even months.

Maintaing Overall Physical Health

Whilst many have tried, it is impossible to fight the ageing process, although you can be pro-active in helping your body to maintain it’s optimal physical condition as you get older.

A regular resistance training programme is an excellent way to maintain and improve the things that sadly decline as your body ages, including your strength, bone density, joint function amongst many other health benefits.

In addition to the above, some of the wider benefits of developing a well supported, strong joint and muscular system include helping to reduce the chances of diabetes, various back pains and arthritis to name but a few.

Gain A Better Understanding Of Bio Mechanics

It goes without saying that to get the benefits of any exercise regime, it is important to make sure your technique is correct. This is especially true with regards to Strength Training. Poor technique could do you some serious harm and fly directly in the face of the benefits of undertaking this kind of training in the first place.

Having the correct awareness of how your muscles, joints and posture all work together when performing various resistance exercises will enable you to get the most effective results and benefits.

Gaining an awareness of bio mechanics in relation to resistance exercises can positively translate to improvements in technique in the Martial Arts. With Martial Arts techniques also heavily relying on an understanding of the physics of how the body pivots, transfers weight effectively, deflects and applies force etc…

Train Harder For Longer

Strength Training can increase the level of work load that your muscles can partake in over a period of time. Combined with a good aerobic exercise regime, you will obviously find yourself being able to perform at a higher level for longer.

A high level of endurance can benefit you by reducing the effects of fatigue and the various results of lapses in concentration that can follow this.

Mental Strength

Anyone who has recently taken up a resistance training regime will understand that to make those incremental gains takes a positive mindset as well as physical strength. As you churn out that final rep after you’ve increased the resistance weight, you might start to hear that little voice saying “you can’t do this” or “it’s too heavy” etc… A strong positive mindset along with the help of a trusted spotter, can really help you to push through that mental / physical pain barrier.

There’ll be times when you can’t beat the weight, but you’ll stick to your plan and you will progress and move forward over time. This regular repeated cycle of pushing yourself to the point of failure, moving up a level and seeing physical improvements can have massive benefits on how your philosophy as a Martial Artist.

Progressing as a Martial Artists can be a long road with difficulties and set backs, but employing an approach that focuses on improvement through steady and consistent goals as well as regrouping when you come to a stumbling block is certainly something that can go hand in hand and backed up with a good Strength Training programme.

What Kind Of Strength Training Should I Do?

As a Martial Artist, you will want to make sure that your programme increases your strength without bulking you up too much. Gaining too much size is unlikely to benefit you and will even restrict your movement and slow you down. We advise that you consult with a Strength and Conditioning Coach and clearly set out your goals and why you want to develop your programme.

Low Set Volume and High Speed and Explosive Reps are just a couple of pointers to take in to account when drawing up your programme, good luck!

Don’t forget, that having the right equipment and apparel for the job will be a factor in the effectiveness of your programme too. Give yourself the best chance to train to your maximum with performance enhancing Fight Shorts, Rashguards and Compression that helps to aid freedom of movement and reduce injury.

MMA Fightwear’s Favourite Martial Arts Movie

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Why Enter the Dragon is one of our favourite Martial Arts Movie of All Time

1 – It stars Bruce Lee

The film stars Bruce Lee, there’s a good enough reason for anyone.

2 – It set the bar high for future martial arts movies

The film was the first Chinese martial arts film to be produced by a Hollywood studio and went on to be a box office smash, paving the way and setting the bar high in terms of quality for future movies in this genre.

3 – Subtle but potent statements in the storyline

Whilst the storyline may not have been anything spectacular in terms of originality, there were some aspects of it that there were quite potent at the time the film was shot.

The back story about the sister of Bruce Lee’s character killing herself in the face of being raped by Han’s henchmen was quite a statement.

In addition to this, fellow leading character, ‘Williams’, being on the run after beating up a couple of white racist cops back in America highlighted the tensions of the civil rights movement in 1970’s America.

4 – Those Kempo Gloves!

Made famous to a wider Western audience by Bruce Lee in his films, his good old Kempo, Kenpo or JKD Gloves, whatever you want to call them, look so cool.

5 – The Mirrored Walls scene

Sporting the now famous open slashes across his torso in a James Bond style showdown with the big boss of the film, Lee smashes his way through the mind bending maze of walled mirrors to confront and defeat the claw handed Han.

6 – The almost James Bond style plot

The plot might not be revolutionary, but what is not to love about a Chinese martial arts expert working as a British spy infiltrating a secret drug factory on an island, via the means of a martial arts tournament organised by a megalomaniac with a prosthetic clawed hand?!

7 – The Wisdom of Bruce Lee

There are few moments of Bruce Lee’s philosophical wisdom on display in this classic movie, but our favourite has to be the “… don’t think, feeeeel…” moment, when he instructs a young student on nurturing “…emotional content – not anger!” in to his technique.

8 – The display of different fighting styles

Without going in to the now tiresome debate of “how would Bruce Lee perform in the UFC today”, there’s no doubting his influence on MMA.

His ideas of developing a seamless multi disciplinary style are summed for us in this quote;

“the best fighter is not a Boxer, Karate or Judo man. The best fighter is someone who can adapt to any style, to be formless, to adopt an individual’s own style and not following the system of styles.”

9 – The yellow and black colour combo

Yellow Gi’s and black belts – a colour combination following in the foot steps of that now famous black and yellow jump suit as worn by Lee in the Game of Death.

This super cool colour combo is now commonly used by many sports brands, such as the Hayabusa Limited Edition Black and Yellow Ikusa Gloves, and even though the brands may not have meant it to, for us, it will always pay homage to the master himself.

10 – Geek alert fact!

The two main characters from the epic 1980’s video game, Double Dragon, are named after “Roper” and “Williams”, the two main co-star characters from Enter the Dragon.

Muay Thai Conditioning

Muay Thai Condition

As with the majority of combat sports, Muay Thai places great emphasis on fitness and conditioning.

Training exercises include those familiar to a boxers regime, but there are naturally some notable exceptions. One such exception is the conditioning of the shin bone to harden it, as Thai Boxers rely a lot on kicks using the shin bone.

To toughen up this area of their legs, Thai Boxers will repeatedly strike a densely filled heavy bag, which is highly advisable over the dangerous practice of striking tree trunks or other solid objects which can obviously damage your shins. By conditioning the shin correctly, fighters harden the bone via a process called cortical remodeling.

As far as training equipment goes, the Thai Pad is an essential piece of equipment that allows fighters to practice their kicking, punches, knees and elbow strikes with considerable force due to the densely padded nature of this kind of pad. It is also common for the trainer to wear a Body Protector to allow the fighter to practice their straight kicks and knees to the body.

As with boxing, Focus Mitt pad work sessions are effective ways for a Muay Thai fighter to develop their striking speed and accuracy, as well introducing some Heavy Bag work for developing power. There are gloves available that are more suitable and specific for more Muay Thai also. Such gloves tend to have padded palms and are more flexible than boxing gloves, allowing fighters to hold and clinch their opponents more easily.

Due to the relatively busy schedule of professional Thai Boxers, their sparring sessions are often light in terms of contact to avoid the risk of injury between fights. During sparring sessions, more emphasis is placed on perfecting timing, techniques, range and honing pre fight strategies.

So there you have it, a very brief breakdown in to the training regime and the kind of equipment used for a discipline that is amongst the most physically demanding of any of the martial arts.

Boxing Glove Weight and Size Guide

What size Boxing Gloves should I use is such a common question and one that seems to spark up opposing views.

To make it simple we have shared our expertise with you in an easy to understand way that we hope will inform you to buy the right kind of gloves for you.

Below, we will look at;

Boxing For Fitness – Training Gloves

As is popular today, if you are boxing for fitness and not competing, you will want to find yourself a pair of Training Gloves that will be suitable for light sparring, pad work and bag work.

Once you have found a pair of Training Gloves that suit your budget you will then need to decide on the correct weight of glove.

Use our Body Weight / Glove Weight comparison list below to help you determine the most suitable weight of glove for you.

120lbs or less  – 12oz or 14oz Gloves

120lbs – 150lbs – 14oz – 16oz Gloves

150lbs – 180lbs – 16oz – 18oz Gloves

180lbs or above – 18oz + … Gloves

Taking advantage of the ever increasing number of participants involved in some form of boxing training for fitness, Hayabusa have recently released their Sports line of training gloves to cater for this market.

 

Sparring Gloves

Gloves that are named specifically as Sparring Gloves will have extra soft padding than other kinds of gloves and will normally come in the 16oz weight.

The additional padding is to make sure that both you and your sparring partner are protected and to help to reduce the chance of injury before a competition fight.

If you are lighter in weight (under 120lbs for example) then you could possibly get away with sparring with a 14oz glove.

If you do decide to spar in the same weight of glove that you will be competing at i.e a 12oz glove, make sure that you don’t go too heavy in sparring prior to the fight to avoid unnecessary injuries.

 

Bag Gloves

Specifically named Bag Gloves tend to be at the lighter end of the weight scale, 10 – 12oz, and will use more densely packed layers of foam to absorb the impact of repeated strikes of the heavy bag and pads. For those who are serious about increasing their hand speed, these light weight gloves can be useful in helping to work on this as they do not slow your hands down as much as a 16oz Sparring Glove would.

Having separate gloves for bag work and sparring is useful if you train regularly as it will help to prolong the life of the gloves and provide you and training partners with adequate protection during sessions.

It would certainly be possible to use your Training Gloves for bag work, but be careful of the kind of bag you are hitting, if you’re body weight is at the lower end of the scale. Some bags are harder and more densely packed than others and you could potentially damage your hands without adequate technique, padding and advise from your trainer.

 

Gloves for Competition

Weights for competition gloves vary from 12oz through 16oz, but they will be governed by the level you are fighting at and the organisation that you are boxing under. Always take advice from your trainer on this to make sure that you are well prepared and informed.

 

Our Recommendations

Boxing for Fitness

If you are in this category it is more than likely that you will only be engaging in heavy bag and pad workouts.

If this is the case, we would recommend that you invest in a pair of training gloves by using our body weight and glove weight comparison list above.

If you do engage in light sparring sessions, make sure that you are sparring with someone of equivalent weight who is sparring with the same weight of glove as you for protection and safety purposes.

 

Heavy Sparring, Bag & Pad Work

If you train hard and regularly at a club but don’t compete, then economically and for safety reasons, it would be worth investing in separate gloves that you can use for sparring and for bag and pad work.

By using your Sparring Gloves for their intended purpose only will help them to retain their shape and not stiffen the softer layers of padding for longer. This will reduce the frequency for replacement gloves as well as the obvious safety benefits.

 

Competing Boxers

As above, we recommend having separate gloves for the different kinds of training, but you will also need a pair of competition gloves too. As we’ve already mentioned, it is vital that you consult with your club and trainers about any guidelines that you will need to follow when it comes to specific glove weights.

 

Safety First!

No matter what level you are, choosing the right weight of glove is only the beginning when it comes to safety!

Always remember to wrap your hands prior to any training to make sure that your hands, knuckles and wrists are protected and most importantly make sure that your technique is right.

Even a one off misfired punch can do more damage to your hands and wrists than you think, let alone the long term damage caused by a prolonged period of bad habits.

MMA Fightwear – Favourite quotes!

Everyone loves a good quote, including us! Check out six our favourite combat sport quotes from notable names from MMA, Boxing, Jiu Jitsu and other disciplines.

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If you’ve ever seen the “Last Emperor” fight then you’ll probably recognise that he was pretty damn good at putting this philosophy in to practice. This quote is straight to the point and reveals something of the motivation behind one of the greatest Mixed Martial Artists of our time.

 

Mike Tyson

“Most fighters are the most humble people in the world because they’ve gotten their ass kicked before.”

In his prime, it’s hard to believe that Mike Tyson would have had much experience of getting his ”ass kicked”, but there’s definitely some truth in what he says, taking a beating in the ring by a better opponent certainly keeps you grounded!

 

Carlos Gracie Jr.

“There is no losing in Jiu-Jitsu. You either win or you learn.”

Taking the positives even in defeat is something that we can all learn from and apply to any sport, this short quote epitomises this philosophy.

 

Wladimir Klitschko

“Mental strength is really important because you either win or lose in your mind. And I’m not solely talking about sporting matches, boxing events – anything you do, you do it first with your mental strength. And you can actually train and develop it, and I am responsible for what I’m saying because I have experience with that.”

“Dr. Steelhammer” shares his wisdom about the power and importance of mental strength and how this can be improved through training.

 

Bruce Lee

“I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.”

Bruce Lee reveals his fear of those who dedicate their training and specialise in a particular technique. We wonder if he would have felt the same facing the might LHK of Mirko Cro Cop in his prime?!

 

Lao Tzu

“The best fighter is never angry”

Short and sweet from the ancient Chinese philosopher. As with many of these kinds of quotes they are open to interpretation and require you to look in to them a little deeper to grasp their meaning. We like this one because it sums up the need to contain your aggression, remain focused and keep a cool head during a fight.

 

We’ve covered a few different disciplines with our favourite quotes above, but don’t forget that we also cover a range of disciplines when it comes to supplying you with top quality apparel and equipment to help you get kitted out and apply some of your new found wisdom that you’ve acquired from reading this post 😉

Martial Art Work – From Paint to Pixels!

Depicting scenes from combat sports in various forms has been a popular subject for many artists throughout the ages. We’ve picked out a few that caught our eye, from established artists, enthusiasts and unknown creators alike!

Starting off with the image below, depicts a scene from Ancient Greece where we have two boxers battling it out, being over looked by two apprehensive looking referees or umpires. Beneath that, there is a fresco style wall painting depicts two youths engaged in a kind of playful boxing match, wearing what appears to be some sort of early form of glove or wrap! Despite it’s good condition, this painting is said to date back to around 628 B.C. from the Minoan civilisation from the Aegean Bronze Age!

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As you will see a lot of the images feature boxing scenes, the next from our selection  shows two Edo warriors practicing their Judo techniques, with one being masterfully thrown by the other.

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On to boxing now and as one of the foremost practitioners of lithographic printing, Theódore Gericault, applied his skill for depicting sporting scenes and athletic figures, as highlighted by the artwork below simply called, “Boxers” (1818).

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Whilst this next painting by Antonio del Pollaoilo “Hercules & Anteaus” (1890) doesn’t depict a specific style of fighting, we thought we’d add to the mix purely because it shows Hercules in a kind of wrestling match, using his unmatched strength to bear hug a giant to death!

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The next painting by American artist, George Bellows “Both Members of This Club” (1909), features Joe Gans an eight year Lightweight Champion title holder. At the time of this painting, public boxing had been made illegal due to corruption, although some clubs like, Tom Sharkey’s Athletic Club (where the match depicted took place) had managed to find ways around this. Interestingly though, the fighters were only granted membership to the club during their bouts, not prior to or after the fight had begun and ended. Boxers were viewed with a low opinion and were thought of as socially unacceptable.

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Following on with another boxing painting, featuring Joe Louis’s victory over Max Schmeling, “The Brown Bomber” was painted by Robert Riggs in 1938. Full of detail, this scene captures the moment when Schmeling’s cornerman threw in the towel after the German fighter took a barrage of blows to the head result in him hitting the canvas three times in quick succession.

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Moving on to more modern day works and looking more at Mixed Martial Arts, with a sketch by artist Christoper Rini. We think this could a preparation sketch for a painting showing part of a fight between Mauricio “Shogun” Rua and Dan Henderson judging by the writing to the top left of the drawing.

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We liked this pastel drawing of Urijah Faber by Daniel Peci because of the way the rough marks made by the artist give a sense of movement and dynamism to the fighter as moves his body forward to throw the right hand punch. He cleverly uses limited colours to pick out highlights and shadows to give the figure a 3-D form too.

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We’re unsure of the artist responsible for producing this highly detailed print of Georges St Pierre, but we were impressed with the level of detail shown here. You can really get a sense of the force being applied by GSP as he applies his grip, surely this was followed by a tap out shortly after!?

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We picked out this last image, purely for the novelty aspect! We love the pixelated versions of some of the stars of the UFC, they’re a pretty good likeness too, although we’re not sure who the pet monkey belongs too!

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Hayabusa Equipment Re-Stock Notice!

We have fully re-stocked the highly popular and sought after Hayabusa Kanpeki Elite Series 2.0 equipment line.

We have also topped up our stocks to meet the demands for the Hayabusa Tokushu and Ikusa Series equipment lines too.

These ranges from Hayabusa are amongst our most in demand products so if you have been waiting for any of this to come back in to stock, grab yours while you can!

The Ancient Roots of Muay Thai

Tony-Jaa-Ong-Bak

In this blog post, we’ll look at the roots of Muay Thai to uncover it’s links with the ancient fighting arts of Indo-China.

Our focus will be on Muay Boran, the collective name given to the unarmed martial arts of Thailand, prior to modernisation in the 1930’s. Each of the arts under the umbrella term of Muay Boran, had their own style guards, striking techniques and stances.

The distinctive regions of the Siam (Thailand) empire each had their own fighting styles and during the mid to late 19th century, fighters from each region would be sent by their Lords to Bangkok to compete in tournaments to establish who the best fighter was. Over time, such gatherings saw the different regional styles merge during the Rattanakosin Era and became generically referred to as Muay (meaning Boxing or pugilism). Despite this, regional styles still existed and were practised in various parts of the country.

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Buddhist monks carried on the teaching of Muay as a fighting technique for unarmed warfare and it also became a popular combat spectator sport for all levels of society. As well has having a broad appeal to people across the strata of society, Muay also had it’s royal connections too. The most skilful and respected of fighters were often employed by royalty of the day to train soldiers and other notable courtesans in the art of Muay.

During the mid 19th Century, a time of peace for Thailand, the popularity of Muay had greatly increased and was a regular form of exercise and recreation as well as serving it’s original functions. Despite the blending of styles that we’ve already mentioned, four distinct regional styles were still in existence various parts of the country. These four styles were;

• Muay Thasao (North)

• Muay Khorat (East / North East)

• Muay Lopburi (Central)

• Muay Chaiya (South)

Moving in to the 20th century saw the introduction of the boxing ring and codified rules, including the necessity for fighters to wear western style gloves and to move away from the heavily wrapped hemp rope style shown below. During this time the old regional styles mentioned above began to die out due to a combination of being banned and being unsuitable for the more modern matches.

muayboranhandIt was common for Muay Boran fighters to tie knots in to the hemp rope used to wrap their hands, for added protection and to make their punches more abrasive and harmful to their opponents.

As a result of the new rules and the introduction of more protective equipment, the new style that began to emerge during the 20th century started to become known as Muay Thai, with the older style being labelled as Muay Boran (or ancient boxing).

Today, Muay Boran is rarely taught due to the techniques not being able to be used in modern competition. As a style, Muay Boran required fighters to be extremely agile, fast and flexible. The stance was different to that of Muay Thai, with it being wider and lower and more akin to the traditional Chinese and Indian Martial Arts.

The simple rule base excluded eye gouging, grappling, hitting a grounded opponent, hitting the groin and hair pulling. There were no weight categories or formal rings that we are familiar with today. With regards to the timing fights, and something that can still be seen today, a coconut shell with a hole in was placed in water and the fight lasted until the shell thoroughly sank and became immersed in water. This was followed by the beating of a drum to signal the end of the round.

The profile of Muay Boran was raised again fairly recently due to the 2003 film, Ong Bak, featuring Tony Jaa (see header image). The Muay Boran fighting styles heavily featured in this movie and was probably the first time it had been seen by the majority of its western audience.